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Siemens Competition 2012
Kensen Shi of College Station, Texas, Wins $100,000 Individual Prize for Research on Robot Navigation;

Jeremy Appelbaum of Woodmere, New York, and William Gil and Allen Shin of Valley Stream, New York, Win $100,000 Team Prize for Research on Plant Protein


Research projects on robot navigation and on a tumor-suppressing protein today earned four remarkable students entrée into the prestigious $100,000 winners' circle of the Siemens Competition in Math, Science & Technology, the nation's premier research competition for high school students. The students join a highly selective group of just 13 individual competitors and 13 teams who have previously been awarded Grand Prizes in the Siemens Competition.

Kensen Shi, a senior at A&M Consolidated High School in College Station, Texas, won the $100,000 Grand Prize in the Individual category for developing a new method to improve robot motion planning. Jeremy Appelbaum, William Gil and Allen Shin, seniors at George W. Hewlett High School in Hewlett, New York, will share the $100,000 Grand Prize in the Team category for investigating COP1, a key protein in plants and animals.

The Siemens Competition is a signature program of the Siemens Foundation, a leading supporter of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education in the United States. The Competition is administered by the College Board. The fourteenth annual awards were presented this morning at The George Washington University, host of the 2012 Siemens Competition National Finals.

The Winning Individual
Kensen Shi won a $100,000 college scholarship for his project, Lazy Toggle PRM: A Single-Query Approach to Motion Planning.

The Winning Team
Jeremy Appelbaum, William Gil and Allen Shin will share a $100,000 college scholarship for their project, COP1 Arrests Photomorphogenesis in Dark Grown Gametophytes of Ceratopteris richardii; A Study of COP1 in Cryptogams.

National Finalists
Six individuals and six teams competed at the Siemens Competition National Finals. The remaining National Finalists were awarded the following scholarships:

Individuals
• $50,000 scholarship – Jiayi Peng, Horace Greeley High School, Chappaqua, New York (Physics)
• $40,000 scholarship – Samuel Pritt, Home School, Walkersville, Maryland (Computer Science)
• $30,000 scholarship – Saumil Bandyopadhyay, Maggie L. Walker Governor's School for Government and International Studies, Richmond, Virginia (Electrical Engineering)
• $20,000 scholarship – James Howe, Regina High School, Iowa City, Iowa (Biology)
• $10,000 scholarship – Raghav Tripathi, Westview High School, Portland, Oregon (Biochemistry)
Teams

• $50,000 scholarship – Daniel Fu, Park Tudor School, Indianapolis, Indiana, and Patrick Tan, Carmel High School, Carmel, Indiana (Mathematics)
• $40,000 scholarship – Neil Davey, Montgomery Blair High School, Silver Spring, Maryland, and Katie Barufka, Langley High School, McLean, Virginia (Microbiology)
• $30,000 scholarship – AJ Toth and Jim Andress, Oak Ridge High School, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Computer Science)
• $20,000 scholarship – Jonathan Tidor and Rohil Prasad, Lexington High School, Lexington, Massachusetts (Mathematics)
• $10,000 scholarship – Thomas Luh, Leland High School, San Jose, California, and Joy Jin, Henry M. Gunn High School, Palo Alto, California (Biology)